Tagged with best practices

Humility, Not Technology

Humility, Not Technology

From the Good Intentions file comes another story about well-meaning entrepreneurs in the developed world trying to “do something good” for people in the Global South. Sadly, the results are predictable. This time, the do-gooders are the team at Uncharted Play, who designed Soccket, a soccer ball that harnesses kinetic energy to power small appliances. … Continue reading

Social Entrepreneurship and Self-Discovery

Social Entrepreneurship and Self-Discovery

Casting about on the interwebs on an entirely different task the other day, I came across this thought-provoking post by Lara Galinsky of Echoing Green on social entrepreneurship. Given the immense popularity of social entrepreneurship and Echoing Green’s role in promoting it, I was intrigued that Galinsky took on the task of examining its shadow … Continue reading

What to Do When Things Go Wrong

What to Do When Things Go Wrong

On Jennifer Lentfer’s blog on international development, a discussion is under way about “how our own personal approach affects the relationships and processes of which we are a part,” or as I interpret it: how our own baggage helps or hinders our efforts to make the world a better place. Of the many questions up … Continue reading

Room for Error

Room for Error

For many of us working in the non-profit sector, internationally and domestically, the power of learning is not just a slogan. It’s the value that undergirds the programs that we help deliver, programs designed to support people in discovering their own talents and skills to better their well-being, their environment, and their society. It’s a … Continue reading

What We Talk about When We Talk about Self-Sufficiency

What We Talk about When We Talk about Self-Sufficiency

Self-sufficiency is one of those concepts in non-profit and development work that we rarely question because it seems like such an obvious goal. When it comes to funding, most organizations I’m familiar with would prefer to have the autonomy they need to carry out their missions. Funders, meanwhile, often have limited resources in what looks … Continue reading